Indiana Vegetable Planting Calendar/Guide (IN): Month Wise, Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer, Zone 5, and Zone 6

It’s a perfect time to plant that garden you’ve always dreamed of! Gardening is a relaxing hobby for many people and a rewarding educational experience for young people. Vegetables that will be eaten by your family and those that will thrive in your Indiana climate are also factors to consider.

Indiana Vegetable Planting Calendar/Guide (IN)
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Below we learn the Indiana vegetable planting calendar, the Indiana vegetable zone-wise planting guide, what vegetables grow well in Indiana, month-by-month planting schedules for different regions of Indiana, and about the hardiness zones of Indiana state.

Indiana vegetable planting calendar/Guide (IN)

When can you start tomatoes in Indiana?

Tomatoes are the most popular garden veggie. All tomato varieties need planting after the average date of the last frost in your location, so be sure to wait until then before starting your tomato garden. In southern Indiana, they grow from middle to late April, and in northern Indiana, early to mid-May. However, the soil temperature is also crucial.

Soil temperatures this spring have been much below the optimal 60 °F range for tomato growth. Tomatoes are a staple in modern vegetable gardens, with wide different varieties. To begin, classify the fruits according to size and form. Currants, standard slicing, cherry/grape, plum, pear, salad, and beefsteak tomatoes range from tiny to big. The second way to categorize tomatoes is by how long it takes for the plants to produce fruit.

The days to harvest are usually listed on seed packs. However, cultivars can also be broken down into early, midseason, and late maturing. Early cultivars can be transformed into the garden in 55–65 days. The number of days between 66 and 80 is considered midseason. Late kinds transplant after more than 80 days.

What can I plant in May in Indiana?

After frost has passed, plant cold-hardy crops. This comprises most annual flowers and fragile perennials in addition to warm-season vegetables (including peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, and vine crops). To maintain a dense, multi-branched structure and promote compact growth in chrysanthemums and other annual flower plants, pinch back their stems as they emerge. To lengthen the time between harvests, sow beans and sweet corn in succession.

Early-planted crops, including carrots, spinach, lettuce, and beets, must have their seedlings thinned to the appropriate spacing. Pick the first of the spinach, radishes, and lettuce. The sluggish arrival of spring might mean a later start to the asparagus and rhubarb growing seasons. Cut or snap asparagus stalks at or slightly below soil level to harvest. Pick rhubarb by snatching the stem and yanking it up to one side or using a sharp knife.

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Brussels Sprouts
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As soon as the seeds germinate or the transplants are established, cucumber beetles should be eliminated from the environment to avoid the spread of bacterial wilt. To encourage stronger runner development in freshly planted strawberries, remove the flowers. When fresh branches reach a height of approximately a foot, prune off any undesirable sucker growth.

When should you plant potatoes in Indiana?

Potato seedlings should be planted around the middle of March. Spread some straw over the top of the mound of soil. It is recommended that at least three eyes be left on each section of seed potatoes before they are cut. Plant the seed potatoes on top of the straw, leaving approximately 6-8 inches between each one. Use a straw to conceal the potatoes. Put a hump of soil on top of the straw. The potato plants need some time to develop. The potatoes will be much easier to clean after being harvested, and the straw should protect them from decaying.

What gardening zone is Indiana?

The state of Indiana has a humid continental climate, which means the summers are hot and rainy, and the winters are cold and dry. The state of Indiana generally has two planting zones due to the harsh weather. More precipitation falls in the state’s southern section throughout the year due to its humid subtropical climate. The transition from the frigid winter to the considerably warmer spring season often results in a busy thunderstorm and tornado season in Indiana in the spring.

This is perhaps the most prominent characteristic of the state’s climate. Extreme heat and humidity are typical throughout the summer months. To properly prepare for a garden, one must first learn the appropriate planting zones for Indiana. This can be done quickly and easily with the help of a planting zone map available online. Most of Indiana falls within a narrow growth zone range of 5b to 6b. A garden without designated planting areas is incomplete.

They provide a methodical approach to answering the question, “What plants will thrive best in our region?” and “When should we plant?” Knowing when the danger of frost is at its least likely to occur is essential to growing a healthy garden. Plants hardy in your zone or below can be safely grown almost everywhere. Always check the hardiness zone before planting anything since plants from higher zones frequently perish in our harsh winters.

For instance, if you’re planting in zone 5b, you can safely use any zone-appropriate seed packets or starts. Indiana’s planting zones are ideal for growing various fruiting and flowering plants. Coneflowers, coral bells, foxgloves, hostas, ice plants, and so on should all do well there. Think about growing sugar snap peas, green beans, cherry tomatoes, radishes, carrots, and pumpkins in your next vegetable garden.

How late can you plant green beans in Indiana?

If transplants weren’t readily available, that would be the first problem. After July, there isn’t much left at garden centers. For example, green beans, maize, and squash may have their seeds sowed in small batches every week to ten days from early June through late July. Cauliflower, broccoli, and cabbage are late crops whose seeds should be sown in late July. Beginning in August, you can start sowing lettuce and pea seeds every two weeks for a late harvest.

What can I plant in April in Indiana?

Plant cool-season veggies as soon as the soil is dry enough. Soil shouldn’t clump up when compressed. Parsnips, spinach, carrots, beets, peas, lettuce, turnips, and Swiss chard can be direct-seeded. Plant broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, kohlrabi, and onions. Plant asparagus and rhubarb crown in-ground or in planters. It’s best to wait three years after planting to start harvesting to let the plants mature.

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Cucumber farming
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Put in the ground potato “seed” tubers that have been verified as disease-free. Leave the greenery of spring bulbs standing even after the flowers have faded. The leaves produce the food reserves stored in the bulb for use in the next year’s bloom. Grow tough perennials like tulips and sedums. Prepare your landscape for spring by starting caladiums and tuberous begonias inside.

Strawberries should have their winter mulch removed, but it should be kept on hand in case of late frosts to aid in weed control. Small fruit like strawberries, raspberries, and others can be planted or transplanted. Thin out unhealthy or damaged vine branches. When necessary, fix the trellises that are holding up your garden.

When should I start my garden in Indiana?

We can’t wait to take advantage of the nice weather once the chance of frost in the morning has passed. While it’s true that certain garden staples can’t handle the milder temps of early spring, there are plenty of alternatives that get a head start and even flourish in the milder conditions. These veggies grow well in mild climates and mature rapidly, so you can get an early start on the new harvest in your kitchen.

As the final frost in Indiana occurs towards the end of April, the state’s growing season can officially kick off in May. Radishes, carrots, chard, leafy greens, beets, and turnips are all quick-growing vegetables that do well in the chilly season. They can be started from seed, and the harvest will coincide with the onset of warmer weather. When planted early in the season, these veggies provide a nutritious taste even before the rest of the garden is ready.

Vegetables like cauliflower, broccoli, and cabbage may also be planted in early May because of their short growing seasons. These plants can take longer to mature, but they’ll be ready to harvest by June. Almost any time of year is good for planting and growing some of our favorite resilient veggies since they aren’t picky about the weather or the season. We prefer to plant our onion sets and potato seedlings in the spring to have fresh produce throughout the year.

What month do you plant corn in Indiana?

The best time to sow corn in Indiana for optimal yield is between April 20 and May 10. This “window” can be moved one week sooner for counties in the state’s southern region and one week later for counties in the northern region. However, late planting does not always guarantee low yields from corn. Corn production is affected by several aspects and situations throughout the growing season beyond the planting date. 

Late-planted corn can sometimes out-yield early-planted corn due to exposure to varied environments. Keep in mind that corn requires 115 growing degree days to emerge and that if the soil temperature is just 50 degrees Fahrenheit and stays at that temperature for an extended period, it may take as long as 35 days. If maize is put into the soil where the average daily temperature is over 65 degrees Fahrenheit, the crop may emerge in as little as seven days.

What can I plant right now in Indiana?

Fall gardening in Indiana 

Many types of vegetables thrive in the lower temperatures and increased rainfall of late autumn in Indiana. Long, hot summer days cause many spring-planted crops, such as radishes, lettuce, and spinach, to bolt and become bitter. By planting in the fall, you can keep picking fruits and vegetables long after summer harvests have gone. Broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts are three examples of crops that thrive in the chilly conditions of autumn gardening. Temperatures rise rapidly in Indiana throughout the spring.

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Green beans
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Many crops do better when planted in the autumn since insects and diseases are less of an issue. Several vegetable crops thrive when planted in the late summer for harvest in the autumn. When possible, grow quick-maturing cultivars to get a crop in before the first deadly frost. You can find out what kinds of plants and seeds are sold in garden centers nearby. Remember to plan for the autumn garden if you prefer to purchase your seeds and plants. 

Removing weeds and waste from the previous crop prepares your garden for the autumn harvest. Deep rototilling or spading (at least 6-8 inches) is required. A general analysis fertilizer, such as 12-12-12, may be administered at a rate of 1-2 pounds per 100 square feet of bed space. The soil and fertilizer must be well combined.

Plants that go in during the latter part of summer frequently wither and die because of the high temperatures and lack of moisture in the soil. In dense soils, a crust of soil can develop over the seeds and prevent them from germinating. To avoid crusting, spread a thin layer of vermiculite, compost, or peat moss over the seed row. 

When the soil temperature rises over 85 degrees Fahrenheit, it becomes too hot for lettuce, peas, and spinach seeds to grow. The soil temperature may be maintained at a more optimal level for germination by shading it and applying a little mulch over the seed row. Sowing the seeds a little deeper than spring may be good because of the slightly lower temperatures and increased moisture availability.

Protect your seedlings and transplants from over-drying by keeping the soil moist. If rain is insufficient, you should water the soil by applying 1 inch of water weekly. Young seedlings may require frequent watering in the initial week or two of development. Young plants can benefit from partial shade for the first few days after being transplanted as their new roots establish themselves.

Spring gardening in Indiana 

When spring arrives, remove any protective mulch placed during the winter on plants like strawberries and freshly planted perennials. But keep mulch nearby if the sensitive new shoots are nipped back by spring frost. Many weeks remain until the usual date of the last frost. Tender roses may need their protecting cones or soil mounds removed. If you protected the bark of a young, thin-barked tree this past autumn with tree wrap or plastic, you should remove it immediately before the weather becomes too hot and causes damage.

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Pepper farming
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Ornamental grasses are lovely in the winter because of their rustling sound and soft texture. But the old, rotting stems must be lopped down to the soil so fresh greenery can emerge. If you didn’t do it in the autumn, you could also need to prune any herbaceous perennials that haven’t bloomed yet this year.

We can’t wait to take advantage of the nice weather once the chance of frost in the morning has passed. While it’s true that certain garden staples can’t handle the milder temps of early spring, there are plenty of alternatives that get a head start and even flourish in the milder conditions. These veggies do best in mild climates and grow rapidly, so you can get an early start on the fresh food season in your home.

As the final frost in Indiana occurs towards the end of April, the state’s growing season may officially kick off in May. Carrots, chard, radishes, leafy greens, beets, and turnips are all quick-growing vegetables that do well in the chilly season. They can be started from seed, and the harvest will coincide with the onset of warmer weather. When planted early in the season, these veggies provide a nutritious taste even before the rest of the garden is ready.

Vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage can also be planted in early May because of their short growing seasons. These plants can take longer to mature, but they’ll be able to be harvested by the end of June. Almost any time of year is good for planting and growing some of the resilient veggies since they aren’t picky about the weather or the season. It is to our advantage to begin growing your potatoes and onion sets in the spring so that we may have them for a longer period throughout the year.

Summer gardening in Indiana 

Heat-loving plants thrive in the warmer temperatures of the summer. Many of them do best in about 70 degrees Fahrenheit soils, so you should wait until you’ve had a few days of warm, sunny weather. Heat-loving summer crops like beans, sweet corn, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, eggplants, melons, watermelons, squash, and pumpkins cannot be planted until late May or early June. 

Seeds or seedlings can be utilized to jumpstart the season and postpone transplanting by six weeks. So that you don’t waste your time and energy tending to plants that won’t be ready to pick and eat before the first frost of autumn, it’s essential to keep track of when each variety you’re considering will mature. Plants should be selected that thrive in Indiana’s climate and can be grown without excessive care over the season’s 173 growing days, which spans from the first frost to the last.

Apples, cherries, grapes, blueberries, and raspberries are just a few of the tree and bush fruits at their peak for picking in the late summer. Meanwhile, they’ve been busy setting down roots and using the warm weather of spring and summer to develop and mature wonderful fruit for you to enjoy.

Winter gardening in Indiana 

All garden plants benefit from winter mulch, but those with lower hardiness levels can be saved if applied. The function of winter mulch is distinct from that of summer mulch. The major advantages of winter cover are that it shields the soil from severe temperatures and protects the plants from the cold. Extreme temperature shifts can cause soil to heave, forcing plant roots to rise above the ground.

Plants with shallow roots, like strawberries or those that have just been planted and have not had time to establish a stable foundation, are particularly vulnerable to the effects of heaving. Also, having mulch around your plants in the winter can protect them from the harsh cold. Mulch, such as pine needles, straw, hay, or bark chips, spread at 2 to 4 inches, is usually sufficient for protecting plants from the elements. Roses, for example, require more complex care than other plants.

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Tomato farming
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When putting mulch in the winter, timing is everything. Mulch should be used when the ground has been frozen for at least a few hours. If you put it on too soon, it can suffocate the plant and promote the growth of diseases. You can’t have a proper winter garden without at least one hardy kale type. When the weather becomes colder in the late fall, kale tastes better. It’s common knowledge that lettuce is one of the greatest winter crops to cultivate.

Carrots, like kale, beets, and leeks, are at their peak in taste after a light frost or two in late October. A variety of Asian greens is also among the greatest veggies to cultivate throughout the colder months. Gardeners can find a wide variety of delicious Asian greens in seed catalogs. Mache, also known as corn salad and lamb’s lettuce, is an excellent winter crop.

Depending on the plant, the clusters of leaves can be anywhere from two to four inches in diameter, and the whole plant can be collected by cutting the stem off at ground level. The chilly, shorter fall and winter days are perfect for growing spinach. Arugula has the potential for winter harvesting and remains one of the best cold-season crops. Wild arugula and cultivated arugula are the two primary forms of winter arugula.

Indian vegetable planting calendar 

Vegetables Zone 5Zone 6
Beans Mid May to Sep                         May to mid-Oct
BeetsApr to June
mid-July to mid-Oct
Mid Mar to June
mid-July to mid-Oct
BroccoliMid Mar to June
July to Oct
Mar to mid-June
mid-July to Oct
Brussel SproutsApr to OctMay to Oct
CabbageMid Apr to OctMay to Oct
CarrotsApr to Jun
Aug to mid-Oct
Apr to June
Aug to Oct
CauliflowersMid Apr to mid-OctMar to mid-June
CornMid-May to mid-SepMay to Sep
CucumberMid-May to mid-SepMay to Sep
KaleApr to June
mid-July to Oct
Mid mar to mid Jun
Aug to mid Nov
LettuceMid Apr to June
mid-July to mid-Oct
Mid Mar to mid-June
Aug to Oct
OnionsApr to SepMid- Mar to Aug
PeasApr to June
mid-July to mid-Oct
Mid Mar to May
Aug to Oct
PeppersApr to SepMid Mar to Sep
SpinachApr to June
mid-July to oct
Mar to June
mid-July to oct
SquashMid May to SepMay to Sep
TomatoApr to SepMid Mar to Sep

Conclusion 

Nothing ever goes smoothly, and it can be challenging at times. However, the results of your labor will be healthy, fresh veggies. Have fun outside, eat healthily, and work up a sweat. If you live in the following towns, cities, and counties of Indiana (IN) of Zone 5, and Zone 6 in the United States, this article may be helpful in understanding the vegetable planting calendar and a month-wise chart with planting seasons.

IndianapolisMishawaka
Fort WayneCrawfordsville
BloomingtonLogansport
EvansvilleMunster
GarySchererville
South BendWabash
Terre HauteConnersville
MuncieBrownsburg
CarmelZionsville
ElkhartEast Chicago
KokomoNorth Vernon
Michigan CityDyer
ValparaisoScottsburg
HammondSaint John
NoblesvilleColumbia City
FishersKendallville
MerrillvilleSellersburg
JeffersonvilleWinchester
New AlbanyNappanee
West LafayetteRushville
GoshenElwood
PlainfieldCentral Indiana
Notre DameEast Indiana
Crown PointWest Indiana
VincennesSouth Indiana

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